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Read and Check WHS Database Files

Two new tools have been released which are not add-in’s but utilities which are designed to help you get more from the Windows Home Server database.

The first is called WhsDbDump which dumps your Windows Home Server backup database data files to human readable .txt and .xml files for examination. This tool is more of an informational learning tool than an actual utility as it was created to help the developer better understand how the database works.

The second utility is WhsDbCheck, which performs comprehensive checks on the Windows Home Server backup database looking for consistency problems.

Both tools run under the command prompt direct from the Home Server machine. More information is available from the developer’s site Windows Home Server – SafeBackup.

Information courtesy of We Got Served.

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Comments (5)

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  1. Roy says:

    Windows Home Server backup database has consistency problems?

    Explain….

  2. Hi Roy,
    Re-worded the article – No the backup database does not have consistency problems.

  3. James Britt says:

    After reading the revised wording,

    “The second utility is WhsDbCheck, which performs comprehensive checks on the Windows Home Server backup database looking for consistency problems.”

    What’s going on here?

    Why the need for the WhsDbCheck utility that checks for consistency problems? Being how it’s been said above the backup database does not have consistency problems.

    Was the data corruption KB 946676 defect having something to do with the need of using WhsDbCheck looking for consistency problems here?

    I don’t think Microsoft would waste valuable time, effort and money just to release utility tools that are not needed, right?

  4. Hi James,
    These tools are released by a third party and not Microsoft. The developer devised the tools so he could see how the database worked. WHS automatically does database integrity checks to make sure that it is ok, and this tool gives you a graphical interface to show you whats going on.

  5. Kathy says:

    Thanks Philip Churchill for the information. Only, why does WHS need to automatically do database integrity checks in the first place, being how you had mention the backup database does not have consistency problems?

    Obviously WHS is checking the integrity of it’s database files, which is happening “automatically” on a regular basis. Why the need of doing that if WHS doesn’t have consistency problems, right?

    So there must be on a regular basis the opportunity for WHS database files to become corrupt, being how WHS automatically does database integrity checks.

    And just why is WHS automatically doing database integrity checks that need an user graphical interface to show you whats going on? Confirmation?

    Just how does WHS know if it’s database integrity checks out as to be free of corrupted files, missing files or deleted files? Just how does WHS insure it’s database integrity here?

    Hash checksums (CRC, MD5, SHA1), degradation (HDD, MFT Metadata) or infection (root kits, virus, Trojans, worms, etc…) ?

    Microsoft should release the this information, otherwise how are we to trust Windows Home Server?

    How accurate is WHS able to correctly check it’s database integrity? On a percentage? 100% all of the time, less than or is that only in some situations, regarding only certain measures?

    Sure would be nice to know, what to expect, as anyone wanting to use WHS will certainly want to insure no more database corruption taking place, right?

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